Oncology Practice Management Issues


September 2017, Vol 7, No 9

Managing Self-Pay Accounts Receivable in Oncology

Matt Terry, MBA, BSRT

Billing/Accounts Receivable

Self-pay accounts receivable in healthcare includes true self-pay (ie, patients with no health insurance) and the patient responsibility after insurance. In the past, health insurance plan benefits covered much more of the patient’s bill, up to 90% or more; however, in the past few years, high-deductible health plans have become more common and more attractive for plan members because of lower monthly premiums. Thus, the patient responsibility after insurance has shifted from 10% of the collectible accounts receivable to upwards of 30%. [ Read More ]

Oncologists Don’t Have the Luxury of Not Discussing Financial Toxicity with Patients

Chase Doyle

Value-Based Care

Chicago, IL—The issues underlying financial toxicity are undoubtedly complex, but for oncologists looking to help their patients cope, simply noting the cost of treatment from the outset may be the best place to start. As the cost of cancer care continues to rise, greater transparency throughout the process of drug pricing and drug payment needs to become part of the clinical discussion, said Leonard Saltz, MD, Chief, Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, at the 2017 ASCO annual meeting. [ Read More ]

FDA News – September 2017

FDA News

  • Enasidenib, a New Targeted Therapy Approved for Relapsed or Refractory AML
  • Ibrutinib First Treatment Approved by the FDA for Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease
  • Vyxeos First Treatment Approved Specifically for 2 Types of High-Risk AML
  • First CAR T-Cell Therapy Unanimously Recommended by FDA Advisory Committee for Treatment of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Young Patients
[ Read More ]

Proposed Framework for Supporting Caregivers of Patients with Cancer

Laura Morgan

Caregivers Support

Caregivers of patients with cancer are tasked with enormous responsibility to facilitate patients’ daily living activities, medical care, social support, and advocacy. Performing these duties is time-consuming, often requiring caregivers to cut back on hours at their jobs, take extended leave, or even quit. In addition, the psychological burden of caring for patients with cancer frequently manifests in stress, depression, and reduced quality of life. [ Read More ]

When Does Immunotherapy Work Best in Lung Cancer?

Wayne Kuznar

Lung Cancer

Chicago, IL—Response to immunotherapy in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) differs depending on the driver mutation involved and on the amount of PD-L1 expression within the tumor. Immune checkpoint inhibitors in NSCLC—PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors—have similar efficacy and adverse event profiles. These were among the topics discussed at the 2017 ASCO annual meeting in a session on immunotherapy and lung cancer. [ Read More ]

Kisqali (Ribociclib): Second CDK4/CDK6 Inhibitor Approved for Postmenopausal Women with HR-Positive, HER2-Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

Lisa A. Raedler, PhD, RPh

Breast Cancer, Drug Update

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer diagnoses in the United States. The National Cancer Institute estimates that 252,710 American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,610 will die from the disease in 2017. For the majority (62%) of women with breast cancer, the disease is confined to the breast, and the 5-year survival approaches 100%. However, for women with metastatic disease, the likelihood of survival at 5 years drops to 27%. [ Read More ]