Oncology Practice Management Issues


October 2017, Vol 7, No 10

How Your Oncology Practice Can Thrive with MACRA: Get Ready for the Quality Payment Program

Meg Barbor, MPH

Reimbursement

Washington, DC—By now all oncologists know that the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) is shifting physician reimbursement from a volume- to a value-based model. To succeed with MACRA, practices must become familiar with how this will affect them and get ready to incorporate the new measures to ensure they get the best level of reimbursement under this program. [ Read More ]

Clinical Pathways Help Integrate New Drugs, Reduce Variability in Care Delivery

Charles Bankhead

Clinical Pathways

Chicago, IL—Clinical pathways have an important role in the integration of new cancer drugs into clinical practice. Between January 2015 and mid-2017, the FDA granted more than 60 new approvals in oncology, with new drugs accounting for the vast majority (as opposed to new indications). Staying abreast of new drugs and new indications for specific types of cancer requires much time, which presents an extra burden on community oncologists. [ Read More ]

Potentially Practice-Changing Results: PD-L1 Inhibitor for Unresectable, Stage III Lung Cancer

Phoebe Starr

Lung Cancer

Madrid, Spain—Durvalumab (Imfinzi), a PD-L1 inhibitor, improved progression-free survival (PFS) by 11.2 months compared with placebo in patients with locally advanced, unresectable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that did not progress after standard treatment with chemoradiotherapy. These results—presented at the 2017 European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress—come from PACIFIC, the first phase 3 clinical trial of a PD-L1 inhibitor in patients with locally advanced NSCLC outside of the metastatic setting. [ Read More ]

Besponsa a New Treatment Option for Patients with Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell ALL

FDA News

On August 17, 2017, the FDA approved inotuzumab ozogamicin (Besponsa; Pfi­zer), a targeted therapy, for the treatment of adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The drug blocks cancer growth by binding to B-cell ALL cells that express CD22. The FDA designated inotuzumab ozogamicin as an orphan drug and applied its priority review for this approval. [ Read More ]