Survivorship

Helping Patients, Caregivers, and Survivors Navigate Cancer Support Resources: The Art of Connecting People

Meg Barbor, MPH

June 2018, Vol 8, No 6 - Survivorship

Cancer survivors are in it for the long haul, sometimes decades, and their needs change over time, according to Carolyn Messner, DSW, MSW, OSW-C, FAPOS, LCSW-R, Director of Education and Training at CancerCare. Therefore, members of the multidisciplinary care team should work collaboratively to continuously fine-tune the resources available to survivors to provide high-quality, innovative care, “and to get people what they actually need over that long haul,” she said at the 2018 Cancer Survivorship Symposium. [ Read More ]

Adherence to Exercise and Nutrition Guidelines Can Prolong Life in Cancer Survivors

Meg Barbor, MPH

June 2018, Vol 8, No 6 - Survivorship

Many cancer survivors do not meet general recommendations for diet and exercise because of a multitude of common barriers, according to Erin Van Blarigan, ScD, Assistant Professor, Departments of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Urology, University of California, San Francisco. These barriers can be linked to persistent treatment-related side effects, fatigue, conflicting advice, uncertain therapeutic benefit, or the desire to simply “move on” and resume normal life. [ Read More ]

Survivorship Guidelines Present Challenges in Primary Care

Meg Barbor, MPH

May 2018, Vol 8, No 5 - Survivorship

In an ideal world, standardized survivorship guidelines would facilitate coordinated care between oncology and primary care, but in the real world, gaps exist and current guidelines clash, according to Linda Overholser, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine. She discussed her experience using guidelines related to cancer follow-­up care at the 2018 Cancer Survivorship Symposium. [ Read More ]

Understanding Immunotherapy Late Adverse Effects in Cancer Survivors

Meg Barbor, MPH

April 2018, Vol 8, No 4 - Immunotherapy, Survivorship

Because of the novel mechanisms of action of immunotherapies, extended treatment period, and unique toxicities, cancer treatment with immunotherapy warrants special consideration from a survivorship standpoint, suggested Katy K. Tsai, MD, Clinical Instructor, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), at the 2018 Cancer Survivorship Symposium. [ Read More ]

Measuring Financial Well-Being in Cancer Survivorship

Meg Barbor, MPH

December 2017, Vol 7, No 12 - Survivorship

Atlanta, GA—To effectively address socioeconomic disparities in healthcare, particularly regarding cancer survivorship, it is critical that we improve our understanding of the material, psychosocial, and behavioral dimensions of financial well-being, said Reginald D. Tucker-Seeley, MA, ScM, ScD, Edward L. Schneider Chair in Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, at the 2017 AACR Science of Cancer Health Disparities Conference. [ Read More ]

Survivorship Care: Managing Long-Term Side Effects of Lymphoma Treatment

Corbin Davis

December 2017, Vol 7, No 12 - Survivorship

San Francisco, CA—With 5-year survival rates for Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodg­kin lymphoma (NHL) at 86% and 71%, respectively, the number of lymphoma survivors is on the rise, but achieving long-term quality of life after treatment has ended remains a challenge. Data presented at the 2017 NCCN Hematologic Malignancies Congress reveal that treatment-related side effects cause long-term metabolic, endocrine, physical, and mental alterations that impair functional capacity. [ Read More ]

Identifying Long-Term Unmet Needs in Survivorship Care

Meg Barbor, MPH

November 2017, Vol 7, No 11 - Survivorship

New Orleans, LA—The number of cancer survivors is increasing. To keep up with this trend, survivorship care must evolve and become more efficient, insists Jennifer R. Klemp, PhD, MPH, MA, Director, Cancer Survivorship, University of Kansas Cancer Center, Westwood. A growing number of patients are living with or through their disease, while the provider workforce is shrinking. [ Read More ]